EntSciLab | Courses
Welcome to the Computational Enterprise Science Lab Website!
Rahul C. Basole, Professor, Director, Georgia Institute of Technology, Stanford University, Tennenbaum Institute, College of Computing, School of Interactive Computing, PhD, Visualization, Analytics, Ecosystem
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Courses

Researchers in the Computational Enterprise Science Lab teach a wide range of undergraduate, graduate, professional, executive, and online courses covering methods (e.g., analytics, visualization, decision science, systems thinking), enterprise functions (e.g., strategy, innovation, supply chain, marketing), and industry domains (e.g., healthcare, manufacturing, energy, media). Many courses are cross-listed in the College of Computing, Scheller College of Business, and Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech.

CS4460 | Information Visualization (Undergraduate)

Information visualization (infovis) is a rich research area that focuses on the design and use of visual representations and interaction techniques to help people understand, explore, and analyze data. While fields such as scientific visualization involve the presentation of data that has some physical or geometric correspondence, infovis focuses on abstract data without such correspondences such as symbolic, tabular, networked, hierarchical, or textual information sources.

The course follows a lecture/seminar style with discussions, guest speakers from industry and academia, viewing of best-practice videos, and hands-on experience with infovis design and development.

 

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CS4803 | Sports Analytics

The class will discuss the theory, development, and application of analytics in sports. Students will learn about the application of analytics in sports for purposes of in-game strategy, player performance, team management, sports operations, and fantasy competitions, among many other topics. The class will consist of lectures, guest speakers from the sports industry and academia, and culminate with a group project.

CS6451 | Human-Centered Computing (Graduate)

Human-Centered Computing (HCC) is the interdisciplinary science of designing computational artifacts that better support human endeavors. The HCC Ph.D. is the first of its kind, bringing together studies in three related focus areas: human-computer interaction (HCI), social computing, and cognition, learning, and creativity.

 

HCC1 provides an introduction to the field of Human-Centered Computing. It is designed for incoming, first semester HCC PhD students. This class introduces students to theoretical readings that inform the School of Interactive Computing’s approaches to Human-Centered Computing. The class is recommended for students with a theoretical bent. Master’s students considering a PhD in the future may enjoy this class.

 

Topics covered include an introduction to a wide range of theories, and their application to the design of interactive computing systems, including sociology of science and technology, epistemology, social construction of technology, category theory, activity theory, distributed cognition, culture, identity and presentation of self online, learning, and ubiquitous computing.

 

Course Webpage

CS7450 | Information Visualization (Graduate)

Information visualization (infovis) is a rich research area that focuses on the design and use of visual representations and interaction techniques to help people understand, explore, and analyze data. While fields such as scientific visualization involve the presentation of data that has some physical or geometric correspondence, infovis focuses on abstract data without such correspondences such as symbolic, tabular, networked, hierarchical, or textual information sources.

The course follows a lecture/seminar style with discussions, guest speakers from industry and academia, viewing of best-practice videos, and hands-on experience with infovis design and development.

CS/MGT8803 | Data Visualization: Principles and Applications
CS8903 | Readings in Information Visualization

Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum. Mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima.

OMSCS | Data Visualization for Health Informatics (forthcoming)

Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum. Mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima.

Coursera | Healthcare Data Visualization (forthcoming)

Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum. Mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima.

Special Topics / Independent Study